socialfoto:

Sudanese Coffee by bashar_h

socialfoto:

Sudanese Coffee by bashar_h

"

It was easier to explain Sudan’s conflicts with simple dichotomies. The North-South civil war was invariably reduced to “the Muslim North versus the Christian South.” I’m sure you’ve read this sentence before.

When commentators and writers realized that Darfuris were Muslim too, the Darfur genocide became an “Arab versus African” conflict.

But the global community knows next to nothing about the reality of Sudan

"

Read more in “Why we’re ignoring the revolution in Sudan“by Mohamed El Dahshan; a very insightful and analytical article on the situation in Sudan from an outsider’s point of view and why Media isn’t interested.  (via rhapsodicstanza)

Still relevant. 

(via allsudaneverything)
portraitsofboston:

     ”In Nigerian culture, the most important things are God, education, and family—in that order. There are very high expectations, especially from the children of immigrants, to get a college degree—even an advanced degree—and become something very prestigious, such as a doctor. If you become something else, you never really live up to that standard, and if you don’t have a college degree, then you’re nothing. For example, my passion is in design, drawing, buildings, and architecture, but no one really saw a job opportunity with that. If I am an architect or a teacher, which I am now, people would say, ‘Oh, that’s nice, but you could’ve been a doctor.’     “As women, we also face a timetable of expectations at certain stages in our lives: When we are in our early twenties, we should be working on our master’s degrees or doctorates. In our mid- to late twenties, we should be working on getting a husband, and so on. Right now, I should be working on getting a husband.”

portraitsofboston:

     ”In Nigerian culture, the most important things are God, education, and family—in that order. There are very high expectations, especially from the children of immigrants, to get a college degree—even an advanced degree—and become something very prestigious, such as a doctor. If you become something else, you never really live up to that standard, and if you don’t have a college degree, then you’re nothing. For example, my passion is in design, drawing, buildings, and architecture, but no one really saw a job opportunity with that. If I am an architect or a teacher, which I am now, people would say, ‘Oh, that’s nice, but you could’ve been a doctor.’
     “As women, we also face a timetable of expectations at certain stages in our lives: When we are in our early twenties, we should be working on our master’s degrees or doctorates. In our mid- to late twenties, we should be working on getting a husband, and so on. Right now, I should be working on getting a husband.”

Wahaa Leyabie (Somalia)
Marita Getatchew

sincerely-elsh:

One of my favorite Ethiopian songs. The song is sung in both Amarinya and Somali, and is a love song she sings for her Somali lover.

"Enay Addis Ababa, esu yalo Somalay"

"I’m in Addis Ababa, he’s in Somalia"

Someone translate the Somali part for me please. 

niqabisinparis:

Mohamed Wardi in Ethiopia 

givemetaqwa-givemesabr:

strivingmuslimahh:

faineemae:

when you accidentally bite on one of these while you’re eating

Omgggg -_-

I almost start crying
Every. Time.

teethagoddess:

lost-but-saved:

7daystheory:

For the 5th year in a row, the seniors at the Urban Prep Academy of Chicago - an all boys school, have perfect college acceptance. CONGRATS —>
Via: BET // http://bet.us/1i8jhsJ 

Beautiful black excellence!

Chance The Rapper’s little bro Taylor on the right side :)

teethagoddess:

lost-but-saved:

7daystheory:

For the 5th year in a row, the seniors at the Urban Prep Academy of Chicago - an all boys school, have perfect college acceptance. CONGRATS —>

Via: BET // http://bet.us/1i8jhsJ 

Beautiful black excellence!

Chance The Rapper’s little bro Taylor on the right side :)

"The beauty you see in me is a reflection of you."
Rumi (via seelengekritzel)
"Don’t you know that slavery was outlawed?”
“No,” the guard said, “you’re wrong. Slavery was outlawed with the exception of prisons. Slavery is legal in prisons.”
I looked it up and sure enough, she was right. The Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution says:
“Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.”
Well, that explained a lot of things. That explained why jails and prisons all over the country are filled to the brim with Black and Third World people, why so many Black people can’t find a job on the streets and are forced to survive the best way they know how. Once you’re in prison, there are plenty of jobs, and, if you don’t want to work, they beat you up and throw you in a hole. If every state had to pay workers to do the jobs prisoners are forced to do, the salaries would amount to billions… Prisons are a profitable business. They are a way of legally perpetuating slavery. In every state more and more prisons are being built and even more are on the drawing board. Who are they for? They certainly aren’t planning to put white people in them. Prisons are part of this government’s genocidal war against Black and Third World people."
Assata Shakur’s autobiography (via brokencyde)

galaxycosmos:

This is probably my favourite video on the internet… (Its only 30 seconds!)

GloZell shows why cultural representation is so important without really meaning too. 

readyokaygo:

70 foot Palestinian flag dropped in the middle of DePaul (@ThatAlgerian).

readyokaygo:

70 foot Palestinian flag dropped in the middle of DePaul (@ThatAlgerian).

"Good people are like candles; they burn themselves up to give others light"
Turkish Proverb (via hooking)
"Learn to let go of what isn’t meant to be. Realize that nothing lasts forever. Not even broken hearts. Know that the night is given to you so you can recognize the light that follows. That always follows. Rejoice! Rejoice in the knowledge that Allah often takes things that you love away…in order to replace them with something better!"
Yasmin Mogahed  (via livingofthedeen)